01 02 03 Institute for Effective Education, University of York: Study shows delayed school entry yields mental health benefits 04 05 15 16 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 31 32 33

Study shows delayed school entry yields mental health benefits

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A study carried out by Stanford University and the Danish National Centre for Social Research provides evidence that children who delay school entry by one year demonstrate better self-regulation skills when compared to children who start school on time. These benefits persisted as the students progressed through primary school. The authors found that the one-year delay resulted in a 73% reduction in inattention and hyperactivity by the time the average student was 11 years old. Danish children start school in the calendar year they turn 6, so there can be up to a year’s difference in the age of the class.
The data were obtained from a national Danish mental-health screening tool completed by more than 54,000 parents of 7-year-olds and a follow-up of almost 36,000 parents when these same children were 11 years old.

Given that increased ability to control behaviour and pay attention in class leads to improved academic performance, researchers examined school assessment scores and found that students who delayed school entry demonstrated higher scores than those who did not.

Source: The Gift of Time? School Starting Age and Mental Health (2015), The National Bureau of Economic Research.

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